Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters Part 2

Hi, this is George with Argo electrical services and I am the surge protector guy. And this is part two on ground fault circuit interrupters. All right. And I want to specify this is coming from the National Electrical Code. Four Oh 6.4 D. Replacement of receptacles shall comply with four Oh 6.4 D one through D eight as applicable. arc fault circuit interrupter type and ground fault circuit interrupter type receptacles shall be installed in a readily accessible location. Once again, I want to take you back to what we talked about last time. The Consumer Product Safety Commission has reported a decrease in the number of electric fusions in the United States since the introduction of ground fault circuit interrupter devices in the 1971 National Electrical Code and definition, electrocution, I hear people say all the time, oh, well, he got electrocuted and there he goes walking down the sidewalk. If you are electrocuted, that means you have died, you cease to be breathing air any longer. electrocution denotes being dead. Most safety experts agree that GFCIs are directly responsible for saving, saving numerous lives and preventing countless injuries. All right, so the main reason I want to talk about this section, this section allows us to use ground fault circuit interrupter breakers and receptacles where there is no grounding conductor, the ground dead conductor is the white conductor, the grounding conductor is in residential either bare copper or the green wire, okay. Grounding type receptacles where grounding means exist in the receptacle enclosure or an equipment grounding conductors installed in accordance with two 50.1 30 C grounding type receptacle shall be used and shall be connected to the equipment grounding conductor in accordance with four Oh 6.4 C or two 50.1 30 C. This is the point that I want to talk about to non grounding type receptacles where attachment to an equipment grounding conductor does not exist in the receptacle enclosure that means they use cloth wire it was in the 1950s they did not have ground wires in the non metallic non metallic cable or Romex is most residential and most electricians know it to be called the installation shall comply with four Oh 6.4 D to A D to B or D to C A a non grounding type receptacle shall be permitted to be replaced with another non grounding type receptacle. That means if you pull out a two hole receptacle that means a hot and a neutral and there is no ground plug then you should replace it with one just like it. Yes, you can buy them at Home Depot. I know that most of the homeowners, most of your plugs for your appliances, your blender and all that kind of stuff has a three plug setup. However, you you know you’re not allowed to change that receptacle unless you know that they won’t the old style in there not be a non grounding type receptacle shall be permitted to be replaced with a ground fault circuit interrupter type of receptacle. Now, so if you put a GFCI receptacle in that spot, then it can have that third Hall, these receptacles or their cover plates shall be marked no equipment ground and equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected from the ground fault circuit interrupter type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground fault circuit interrupter receptacle. That means you can’t just add a wire to your metal box. You know most of the residential the newer residential homes if the guys go in and they remodel, you know They’re using a composite or a fiberglass box or plastic box, but in the older homes around here, a lot of them were like the old handy boxes, they’re metal boxes, but just because you put a bonding jumper to that box does not make it you know ground compliant as it were. Alright, so let’s move right along here. See a non grounding type receptacle shall be permitted to be replaced with a grounding type receptacle were supplied through a ground fault circuit interrupter where where grounding type receptacles are supplied through a ground fault circuit interrupter grounding top receptacles or their cover plate shall be marked GFCI protected and no equipment ground and that’s protected and no equipment ground I have not seen that sticker yet. visible after installation and equipment grounding conductors shall not be connected between the grounding type receptacles they have an information of some equipment or appliance manufacturers require that to branch circuit to the equipment replies includes an  equipment grounding conductor in that case you would have to run a brand new circuit and informational note number two says C 251 14 for a list of cord and plug connected equipment or classes that require ground grounding conductor and let’s see here. Let’s see if we can pop over there real quick to 50.114 and I have I have my NFP a link pulled up here that’s 114 All right equipment connected my cord All right. So exposed normally noncurrent can carrying metal parts of cord and plug connected equipment shall be connected to the equipment grounding conductor under any of the conditions. One if it’s in a hazardous location to if it’s operated at over 150 volts to ground that means it’s to 20 or better. Motors have guarded shall not be required to be connected to an equipment grounding conductor. Except that was exception one exception to metal frames of electrically heated appliances. exempted by special permission shall not be required to be connected to equipment grounding conductor, in which case the frame shall be permanently and effectively insulated from the ground. That’s why they have the rubber shields on the bottom of them if you’ve ever seen that in residential occupancies refrigerators, freezers and ice makers and air conditioners, clothes washing, clothes drying and dishwashing machines ranges kitchen waste disposals information technology equipment, sump pumps and electrical aquarium equipment all of these have to have GFCI protection our handheld motor operated tools stationary and fixed motor operated tools and light industrial operated tools. D motor operated appliances of the following types hedge clippers lawnmower snowblowers wet scrubbers and E portable Hey headlamps yes okay in other residential occupancies refrigerator freezers icemakers air conditioners oh I already read that one. No, I didn’t. Close washing clothes drying dishwashing machines. Yes, I did read that portable headlamp. Okay, there we go cord and plug connected appliances used in damp or wet locations by persons standing on the ground standing on metal floors, or working inside of metal tanks or molars and G tools likely to be used in wet or conductive locations. Exception tools are portable headlamps portable luminaires likely to be used in wet conductive locations shall not be required to be connected to the equipment grounding conductor, if supplied through an isolating transformer with an ungrounded secondary have not over 50 volts. That means you ain’t got to have a GFCI on your headlamp if you’ve got a nine volt battery in it. All right.
But real quick, the whole reason I wanted to talk about this is just, I have been in many houses where people were trying to sell their home, their parents passed away, or whatever. And, you know, a real slick trick is they have a fairly new panel in the house electrical panel, you can go in there and replace those breakers with ground fault circuit interrupters. And that allows people to change the receptacles out, and it allows the owner, the new owner, the purchaser of the home, to feel a lot safer about their purchase, and the safety that you know they would have by existing on that property. My name is George, I’m with Argos electrical services. I’m out of Gainesville, Georgia, my phone number is 770-596-1437 Give me a call today. If you got any questions you want to talk about stuff, I got a YouTube channel got about 100 videos up there trying to steadily add more. You can always just Google Argo at Argo electrical. Thank you

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